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Recent News

  • 18.09.15

    Attachments:FileDescriptionRELIGIOUS ED FACT SHEET.doc ...
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  • 16.02.15

    Attachments:FileDescriptionPastoral Plan 2015-2018.pdf  Year One.pdf ...
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  • 20.12.14
    What is the Parish Pastoral Council?  Prior to 1999 parishes in our diocese functioned with a group of men and women, elected by the parish members under the heading of Parish Council.  There were four major committees that assisted the Pastor in managing the day-to-day tasks of running a parish.In the year 2000, the Bishop asked all the parishes to adopt a new model of operation call...
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  • 19.12.14
    Patte Grey - FacilitatorIvan HofmannMarty McDanielJeff MinarekJean BleyDonna PavlisAnna VillellaLinda SoldressenDonna Best...
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  • 30.04.13
    Registration forms are found under the "Forms" subsection shown above....
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  • 03.03.12
    We are excited to inform you that we now offer Online Giving! As a church that seeks to serve, we wanted to provide you the convenience of being able to give the way you want, whenever you want. Online Giving offers you the opportunity to make secure, automatic contributions from your bank [or credit card] account to our church.As we begin this new program, you may notice your neighbors placin...
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  • 02.08.11
      Please join the Saturday morning Men’s Bible Study in a journey through the history of the Catholic Church. Learn about the major people, places and events of two thousand years of church history. A DVD by Professor Steve Weidenkopf will be used, followed by a discussion of the material presented. Join us every Saturday morning at 7:30am in Meeting Room #1.  ...
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Events

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Trinity Sunday
The famous icon of the Trinity was “written” around 1410 by Andrei Rublev. It depicts the three angels who visited Abraham at the Oak of Mamre—but is often interpreted as an icon of the Trinity. It is sometimes called the icon of the Old Testament Trinity. The image is full of symbolism designed to take the viewer into the Mystery of the Trinity.
 
The three faces are identical... how might this help us to understand the nature of the Trinity? The figures can be enclosed in a circle what might this tell us about the life of the Trinity?
 
All the figures wear a blue garment - the color of the heavens… but each wears something that speaks of Their own identity.
 
- The Father (left) - a figure at rest within Itself.  The blue garment almost hidden by a shimmering, ethereal robe reveals the One who is Creator and cannot be seen by His human creatures. Both hands clasp the staff. All authority in heaven and on earth belong to
the Father. Behind the figure is a house the dwelling place of God. "In my Father's House are many mansions - I go to prepare a place for you...Those who love Me will keep My word and My Father will love them—and we will come to them and make our home with them".
 
- The Christ (center) - The figure wears the blue of divinity. The brown garment speaks of the earth - of His humanity. The gold stripe speaks of kingship.  
 
The Christ figure rests two fingers on the table—laying onto it His divine and His human nature. He points to a cup filled with wine...
 
Behind the figure is a tree. This could be the oak tree at Mamre under which the three angelic visitors rested. The hospitality of Abraham and Sarah was rewarded in the gift of a son. What does this tell us of the importance of hospitality? The tree may also represent the Cross—the tree on which our Savior died. The tree of death which becomes the tree of eternal life—lost to humanity by the disobedience of Adam and Eve restored to us by the obedience of Jesus.
 
- The Spirit (right)- A blue robe speaking of divinity -
- A green robe representing new life—The Spirit touches the table - earthing the divine life of God. Reflect on that touch. Behind the figure is a mountain. Mountains are places where people often encountered God—places where heaven and earth seem to touch. The Spirit inclines - drawing our gaze to the central figure - representing Christ.